Looking for advice on accepting or rejecting a job offer

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Job offers don’t come everyday, but you don’t want to accept a job offer just because the opportunity is in front of you. There are a lot of things to take into consideration when deciding whether to accept a job offer. Your happiness has to be at the top of the list. 

I found a question on Reddit that has a job seeker in a very fortunate position. The writer is comfortable in their job, but they’ve been given an opportunity to do a job they’re unfamiliar with at a different company. 

“I have been offered a job with similar compensation to my current job and I’m unsure if I should accept. I’m looking for some advice on what to do.

I have been in my current job for two years as a senior data analyst. If I’m being honest, based on my coworkers that have been with the company for a few years longer, I don’t see a promotion any time soon. We’re always busy, I have good interactions with everyone I work with, and have built a trusting and reliable relationship with everyone I’ve worked with. A promotion would be nice and I’ve discussed it some with my boss but I could realistically go into a deeper discussion with her on this. I guess you could say I’ve grown comfortable in the role despite any frustrations. They recently were part of a major sale that had some concerns about job prospects and security but for the moment that seems to have calmed. At this time I’m a hybrid employee where I go into the office once per week and make decent money, although PTO could be better.

My girlfriend brought my attention to her company. She says nothing but great things about them. How she describes them actually reminds me of a former employer of mine that I loved before things started to go bad there. Occasionally I have applied to jobs at her company as it does seem more stable compared to my company and the future outlook seems brighter. It’s a very difficult company to get into but, according to her, once you’re in then you’re set for as long as you want.

Well it finally happened where after some interviews I was finally offered a job with them, but there are some things holding me back from accepting. The job I applied to is not the job I was offered – it’s with the same team but as something different that I’m not exactly sure on. The compensation is very similar. PTO is slightly better. It will be completely remote. I know I would be going into a position where I’ll not be able to master it until a year has passed (what I was told). To me it doesn’t seem worth the job change at this time due to all the uncertainties but my girlfriend disagrees saying more that the company is worth it without thinking about the job I’d be doing.

That’s the gist. I’m looking for some more insight into what to consider here.” 

Many people will say you’re in a very fortunate position, and in one way you are. You have a job you’re comfortable with and you’re being offered a new job at a more stable company. However, I understand your predicament. You’re not only trying to make a difficult decision about leaving a job where you’re comfortable, you’re also dealing with the pressure from your girlfriend to join her company. You’re sort of in a win/win, lose/lose situation. Though you’re in a fortunate position, I wouldn’t call it easy. 

It’s easy for me to sit here and say you’re the only person who can make this decision, but it’s true. Based on what you wrote I understand that you’re comfortable in your current position and company. What you didn’t make clear was whether or not you’re happy. That’s the one question you should be asking yourself, where will you be happier? I had to learn the hard way that more money or a fresh start doesn’t mean you’re going to be happier. 

When it comes to the job being different and taking a year for you to master it, I don’t think that should come into play. Sometimes it’s easier to remain comfortable, but the only way we grow as professionals is making ourselves uncomfortable. The positive I take out of the potential position is, they already told you it’s going to take about a year to master. You know for a fact what the expectations are going to be. 

You have one other option, talk to your current employer. You now have some leverage when talking about your future. The only word of caution I give you is, you have to be prepared to accept the other role if the conversation doesn’t go well. Most people don’t appreciate having their feet held to the fire, but you also need to think about yourself and protect your best interest. 

You’re the only person that can make this decision. You’re doing the right thing by getting other people’s opinions and making an informed decision. I hope this was helpful. Good luck! 

If you have any employment questions you’d like answered, you can email us at compass@jobskills.org 

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